Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fior-di-latte’

Remember going to Famoso for the event featuring world acclaimed pizza chef Roberto Caporuscio from New York City and truly enjoyed the pizzas, I purchased a deal voucher to re-visit Famoso. I wanted to see if their pizzas taste just as good without the live guidance of chef Caporuscio.

I wanted to do it now also because of our recent trip to Naples, where we had the authentic Neapolitan pizzas from L’Antica Pizzeria da Michele, a local pizzeria that has been around since 1870. It was nice and hot; the dough was light yet chewy, toppings were fresh. It was so good we’re still re-living the moments 6 months later.

L'Antica Pizzeria da MichelePizza oven at L'Antica Pizzeria da Michele

Margherita from L'Antica Pizzeria da Michele

Food

Enters Famoso, and an encore of the Prosciutto Wrapped Mozzarella Balls again because we really liked them the last time. And they were just as good as I remembered! The tomato sauce was flavourful, savoury yet not acidic. The fior-di-latte was rich, creamy and gooey; combined with the prosciutto slice this just tasted wonderfully with the tomato sauce.

Prosciutto Wrapped Mozzarella Balls

We ordered two pizzas. First, the Funghi. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

A couple of weeks ago we were invited to Famoso Neapolitan Pizzeria for an event featuring the world acclaimed pizza chef Roberto Caporuscio from New York City. Famoso’s Chef Don Letendre has been spending time with Roberto for the last little while to learn some pizza-making tips from the master. During Roberto’s visit to Vancouver, Famoso decided to host this special event where Roberto prepares an exclusive three-course meal for the guests.

Famoso's founders Jason Allard & Justin Lussier, Don Letendre, MC of the evening, Roberto Caporuscio

Famoso’s founders Jason Allard & Justin Lussier, Don Letendre, MC of the evening, Roberto Caporuscio

Food

The evening started with a demonstration by Roberto on making pizzas. The dough is made of (very little) fresh yeast, water, Caputo “00” flour (highly-refined, low gluten flour imported from Italy) and a pinch of salt. That’s it. And because there’s very little yeast, it takes about 8-10 hour to proof, and the crust would end up to be much softer than other pizza crusts. The dough is being made into dough balls like mozzarella balls, and also has the soft, spongy texture of mozzarella balls. The kneading and stretching of the dough is quite a delicate process, bringing in air to the crust.

First, we had Piccolo Morso. It’s like bruschetta with prawn, peppers, onions and spinach on crostini. It’s a small bite but a good way to start our meal. (more…)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: