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Posts Tagged ‘ribs’

A couple weeks ago, I was invited to a menu tasting at Caché Bistro to check out its patio. Caché Bistro & Lounge is the debut restaurant for Chef Alex Mok, who used to run a underground restaurant for about two years. The dishes served at Caché are inspired by classic French techniques with some Asian twist. Around the dinner table, I was accompanied by Dee, Dennis, Sean, Curtis, and Jeremy & Adrian. Unfortunately, it was a bit overcast on that day so we didn’t really get to enjoy the full patio experience.

Food

The evening started with some refreshing Sangria, using fruits such as strawberries and pineapples, which are not commonly used in Sangria. We could drink jug after jug of this if there wasn’t any wine pairing throughout dinner.

Sangria

Sangria

Our first course was Chef’s Charcuterie. It featured three cured meats from Oyama Sausage Co from Granville Island: (from top of the platter pictured below) Black Pig Sausage, Truffle Salami and Felino. Oyama is known for its great quality of product so there’s no surprise there. Of the three types, I personally enjoyed the Felino the most, which had a little heat to it. The charcuterie platter also included a number of items that Cache made in-house: bread, lobster oil, fig jam and three kinds of compound butter. The lobster oil was quite nice, had a strong, almost shrimp-like essence to it. It reminded me of the traditional wonton soup base which is made of shrimp shells. The compound butters — satay (peanut), cranberry, and truffle — all had their own distinctive flavours, but the truffle one was the most prominent. I was quite impressed by how much they made in-house, all made in small batches to guarantee freshness in everything they put out.

Chef's Charcuterie

Chef’s Charcuterie – Oyama Sausage, fig jam, crostini & lobster oil

Next, Beet Salad as appetizer. Yes, another roasted beet salad with red and golden beets and mixed greens. (more…)

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We were invited by the VANEATS team to try its latest dining package, FalconettisFix, at Falconetti’s East Side Grill. Interestingly, this restaurant has been on my list thanks to another episode of Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. What caught my attention wasn’t the sausage, but the bun (insert jokes here). The curvy bun that is made specially for Falconetti’s.

Falconetti's special curvy bun

Falconetti’s special curvy bun

Food

This is a four-item package, which starts with two 4oz glasses of Blue Buck. It’s a pale ale — light, crisp with a slight hoppy finish. An easy-drinking beer that would be great for warmer weather.

Two 4oz glasses of Phillips Beer's Blue Buck

Two 4oz glasses of Phillips Beer’s Blue Buck

The next three items come together as a platter.

The platter

The platter

First, the Mini Poutine was not bad. (more…)

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Dine Out #3 at Gramercy Grill, a date night with Mr. We chose this place because they offer 4 options for appetizers and desserts, and 6 options for entrees. Some cost extra, but we like options!

Dine Out at Gramercy Grill

Dine Out at Gramercy Grill

Food

To start, I ordered Trio of Oysters. I thought it was a nice way to start given that it’s not another beet salad or squash soup (haha!). I got three decent size Chefs Creek Oysters, meaty with a light, clean finish.

Trio of Oysters of the Day

Trio of Oysters of the Day – mignonette or classic cocktail sauce

Mr. ordered the Beef Tenderloin Carpaccio. It’s not a huge plate but just enough meat to whet your appetite. (more…)

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Last week, we were invited to Memphis Blues’ newest location on Robson Street for its grand opening party. Now who’s going to say no to barbecue meat and beer? I didn’t!

It’s been awhile since I ate at Memphis Blues, so I was curious how its quality has held up. On top of that was our rather disappointing experience at Hog Shack; I was hoping that attending this party would give BBQ joints a chance to redeem themselves.

Memphis Blues on Robson

Memphis Blues on Robson

First I was greeted with a glass of Selbach Riesling. Even though it was a bit drier than most Riesling, its slight tartness (think green apple) helps cut through the heavy, rich barbecue meat. Despite that, on its own it was still a rather easy-drinking white.

Staff working the food stations

Staff working the food stations

Of the variety of meat and sides that we could try, I had a sample of: (more…)

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Joyce and I attended the media launch event at Prestons for its fall menu — my first food blogger-type event. Socializing and Lisa equals: out of comfort zone plus awkward, which also equals to complete social misfit. Nevertheless, still had a good time, met some really cool people, some really flamboyant people, and a couple of drinks.

One of those occasions where cameras are definitely allowed

One of those occasions where cameras are definitely allowed

Menu at the event included a selection of its fall menu items, served appetizer style. Preston states on their menus that they are a West Coast style restaurant with Mediterranean and Asian influence. I’m definitely not an expert in Mediterranean food, but the Asian influence on the dishes was present on many items served that night.

Our first item was the Thai Red Curry. I loved the colour of the dish and the flavour of the curry was pretty spot on, until the heat kicks in at the end. The vegetables were overcooked as well as the rice. The presentation in the tiny glass cup was adorable, until I realized I had to eat it with a giant Chinese porcelain spoon.

Mini Thai Red Curry

Mini Thai Red Curry

My favourite for the night was the Gyoza, described in their menu as seared shrimp and vegetable dumplings with miso vinaigrette. This was definitely not your traditional gyoza, but the presentation couldn’t be better. Each gyoza was served in a bamboo steamer on a leaf, with the vinaigrette drizzled over. (Note: This is a tasting event so items were served/plated in cute, miniature fashion. Chances are you won’t get the same presentation when you dine off the regular menu.) The gyoza itself gave a nice, light finish, but the “vinaigrette” was very heavy and creamy, almost like the consistency of mayonnaise. I’m a sucker for creamy food, so I felt like the pairing was in harmony, light finish from gyoza with the drizzle of heavy cream sauce.

Gyoza

Gyoza

Their Asian-influenced Baby Back Ribs had a decent texture. The meat was tender, fall off the bone, and didn’t leave that nasty fatty feeling in your mouth like some ribs do. The hoisin sauce on it was oddly sweet, but the ginger component was definitely lacking. Would love to come back to try it again, as I think the idea of having an Asian style rib sounds really interesting.

Baby Back Ribs

Baby Back Ribs

This next food was probably one of my least favourites, the Eggplant and Parmesan Slider. (more…)

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Another season of McRibs came and went. What is this that I’m feeling? Anger? Sorrow? Regret? Heart burn? I’m not entirely sure.

All I know is, whatever it may be, it doesn’t hurt as much as the first time.

It’s like your first love. The world seems to stop when it ends, but comes the second, and third, and all the others following just don’t seem to matter so much.

All the same, I am dedicating this post to the end of another season of McRib in Canada. I hope you’ll come back again. But even if you don’t, I think I’ll live.

Brief History

The McRib was first introduced in 1981, but due to lack of popularity, it was discontinued only a few years later. With the exception of being a permanent item in Germany, the McRib has only made sporadic appearances since then. Having appeared in the Simpsons (as Ribwich) and other places in popular culture, it’s a relatively well-known item.

The Sandwich 

McRib

Visually speaking the patty is now just a rectangular block, whereas (if I remember correctly) before, it took on the shape of a slab of ribs. (more…)

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